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Volume 6 (January 2010 to December 2011)


 

The EMMA Emergency Capnometer: a Miniaturized Transportable Device for Monitoring of End-Tidal Carbon Dioxide

 

 

Ernst Zadrobilek, MD1,  Schirin M. Missaghi, MD2, and Klaus Krasser, MD2

 

1Associate Professor of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Chairman of the Austrian Working Group for Airway Management, Vienna, Austria.

2 Staff Anesthetist and Intensive Care Physician, Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Empress Elisabeth Hospital of the City of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

 

Address correspondence and comments to Ernst Zadrobilek.

 

Received from the Austrian Working Group for Airway Management, Vienna, Austria.

 

Published: September 22, 2010.

 


 

The correct citation of this communiction of new equipment and techniques is:

ZadrobilekE, Missaghi SM, Krasser K. The EMMA Emergency Capnometer: a miniaturized transportable device for monitoring of end-tidal carbon dioxide. Internet Journal of Airway Management 6, 2010-2011.
Available from URL:
http://www.adair.at/ijam/volume06/newequipment05/default.htm
Date accessed: month day, year.

 


Last updated: September 22, 2010.


 

Phasein Medical Technologies (Danderyd, Sweden) recently launched the EMMA Emergency Capnometer (EEC), a compact, robust, and miniaturized transportable device for monitoring of end-tidal carbon dioxide. The EEC is a low-weight, battery-powered capnometer for mainstream monitoring of end-tidal carbon dioxide (and also respiratory rate), displaying carbon dioxide in kPa or mmHg and with (EMMA Monitor) or without alarms (EMMA Analyzer).  The EEC is used with a disposable airway adapter; the dead-spaces of the models for adults/pediatrics and for infants are 6 and 1 ml, respectively.

 

The measurement of carbon dioxide by the EEC is based on the fact that different gas components absorb infrared light at specific wavelengths. A beam of infrared light is directed through the respiratory flow in the adapter. As the beam passes through the adapter, some lightis absorbed by the gas mixture. The amount of light absorbed is measured by a miniaturized two-channel spectrometer positioned to receive the infrared light beam. The spectrometer converts the light beam to an electrical signal, which is converted to a digital value. Warming-up time for operation and full accuracy requires only 5 seconds. Two AAA cell alkaline or non-rechargeable lithium batteries allow 8 and 12 hours of normal use, respectively.

 

The EEC may be a valuable device for verification of tracheal intubation and monitoring of end-tidal carbon dioxide during transportation of patients requiring mechanical ventilation and may improve patient care in emergency situations; unfortunatebly, there are currently no studies available supporting this suggestion.   

 

Hildebrandt and co-workers (1) evaluated the EEC during face-mask ventilation obtaining a wide range of carbon dioxide values. The EEC slightly under-read the end-tidal carbon dioxide but was generally comparable with a free-standing reference capnometer; these differences were estimated to be of limited importance in the clinical setting. The precision of the EEC was similar whether new batteries or batteries with reduced voltage were used.

 

The costs of the EEC and the disposable airway adapter are about 990 and 25 Euro (exclusive value-added taxes, according to the offer of the Austrian distributor of the EEC, queried in September 2010), respectively.

 

 

Reference

  1. Hildebrandt T, Espelund M, Olsen KS. Evaluation of a transportable capnometer for monitoring end-tidal carbon dioxide. Anaesthesia 65:953-954, 2010.        


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